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Memories of my Galapagos Eco Tour

Memories of my Galapagos Eco Tour

We reached Isabela Island, and not three steps off the dock, two huge sea turtles floated serenely to the surface of the ocean; almost immediately, five sea lions swoop in and start flipping and frolicking around the turtles, pissing them off entirely but giving us a great show and such a fantastic welcome to the Galapagos.

The following day we hiked up the Sierra Negra volcano, the second largest active volcano on earth…

Volunteering on an African Game Reserve

Volunteering on an African Game Reserve

If you are looking for excitement, adventure and a lot of fun on your trip then African Wildlife Volunteering is a wonderful option. I have been a volunteer at a game reserve for four weeks now and it has exceeded my expectations. Being an ecologist, I was looking forward to getting up close and personal with South Africa’s wildlife and I have not been disappointed.

The main focus of each day is the family of lions on the reserve. Normally we would go out and find the male (he has a collar) at the beginning of each day and record the behavior of all five lions before moving on. This is my favorite part of the day. Even if you are not a morning person (I am not) I am eager to get up at whatever time necessary…

A Week of Daily Wonders in the Galapagos

A Week of Daily Wonders in the Galapagos

It started with a conversation over a few pints: “How are we going to celebrate our … birthdays?”… “Let’s take a trip,” I suggested.
After intense negotiations … five of us settled on the Galapagos Islands…

Several years earlier, I was in Ecuador for a rain-forest excursion and had plenty of time to explore the site of Charles Darwin’s famous observations, which culminated in the classic On The Origin of Species. Lacking the benefit of hindsight and a comfort level with debt, I declined the opportunity, believing the cost to be extravagant. I have regretted it ever since…

Mexican Baja Cruise – Travel Review

Mexican Baja Cruise – Travel Review

We went grey whale watching in Magdalena Bay; Mike called it ‘whale soup’ because there were so many whales in the bay. Occasionally they would be curious and come up to the boats. We saw moms with their new calves as well as mature of both genders getting ready for mating.

The little inn you found for us in San Jose was charming…

Tanzania Safari Report – Part 3

Exploring Serengeti National Park in Tanzania by road and hot-air balloon – by Heather Thistleton This morning I woke at 3:00am as we were picked up at 4:00 to go to the launch site of the hot-air balloon.  It was pitch dark – escort required!! – and a lovely chill was in the air.  When I saw the basket on its side and listened to the instructions on how to get in my heart sank.  Being semi-disabled there was no way I could hold onto the ropes and swing myself in, feet first.  I just don’t have the strength. I explained my problem and showed my hands to the pilot.  “Hakuna Matata” (no worries) was the reply.  Once all the other 15 passengers were in I was lifted by these two big men and loaded feet first like a torpedo, as gentle as ever.  Once they were happy I was comfortable the balloon was ready to go. What an experience.  It is far noisier than I imagined as the regular “firing up” of the gas is very loud and even when they are on “pilot light” it is not silent.  However, the feeling of drifting and seeing the vista around us was magic.   There is something about the African bush with its sounds and smells and the splendour of the acacia trees that cannot be equalled anywhere on earth.  Our balloon landed on its bottom so we all had to scramble out over the rim of the basket.  Okay for some!  No worries, I hitched my bum onto the rim of the basket and on the count of...

Fasten your seatbelt – and see the world in one minute!

3 Guys travel around the world, seeing, learning and eating new things 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage… all to turn 3 ambitious linear concepts based on movement, learning and food and into 3 beautiful and compelling short films….. Enjoy! MOVE  : EAT:     LEARN :     Source: Vimeo video by Rick...

Tanzania Safari Report – Part 2

Olduvai Gorge & Serengeti National Park, Tanzania – by Heather Thistleton After 2 days at the crater we headed off to the Serengeti calling in at the Olduvai Gorge where, in 1959, Mary Leaky made her groundbreaking discovery of a human-like skull dating back 1.8million years.  Since then other human-like species have been found in the area some dating back as far as 3.7million years.  There are even footprints which prove, from their pressure points, early upright human-like beings once lived there.  Volcanic eruptions over time have fossilised many ancient treasures.   This whole area is often referred to as “the cradle of mankind” and worth a read on the internet.  It shows the layers of time from the deep gorge where the soil is black, to volcanic ash, to red lifeless soil, to volcanic ash again and finally Terra Firma as we know it today.  The Tanzanians have a gripe in that the gorge was named by them centuries ago because of the “oldupai” plant that grows in abundance there.  This plant resembles flax and when a blade is cut off and twisted, refreshing liquid drips out of it.  This plant is eaten by the animals to gain moisture in dry season and has been used for generations by the Maasai for “water” and medicine.  The Tanzanians say the German who came to the gorge in the early 1900’s to look for butterflies could not hear properly so he documented it as Olduvai instead of Oldupai.  They are determined to get the history books re-written no matter how long it takes! The Serengeti Lodge is set high on a...

Tanzania Safari Report – Part 1

Lake Manyara & Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania – by Heather Thistleton “Jambo” (hello in Swahili).  A word that echoes everywhere you go when travelling around Tanzania.  The other words used a lot are “Karibu” (welcome/you are welcome) or “Karibu Sana” (you are very welcome) and “Asante” (thank you) or “Asante Sana” (thank you very much). Having just had the most amazing experience of my life in Tanzania it has opened my eyes to the fact that there is a wonderful and safe world out there. It was wonderful to be amongst people who are gentle, proud of their country and know the value of tourism as well as respecting their environment and all life that depends on it. Being semi-disabled and dependent on others for help in many ways my family were concerned about me doing this trip on my own.  They need not have worried as I was treated like royalty and helped in any way I needed.  This assistance was given eagerly, gently and with great pleasure. The flight on Air Tanzania was wonderful with the steward noticing my hands and just automatically opening things for me.  I normally have to ask.  Passengers received a warm welcome and an efficient issuing of visas on arrival at Kilimanjaro Airport.  My first night was at Kia Lodge on the perimeter of the airport.  Early next day we went to Arusha to collect the 2 Canadian couples that made up our party of 5.  Having such a small group was a bonus and I could not have been luckier with the strangers who became friends during the next 6 days together....
TRɅVELBOECKER ɅDVENTURES eNEWS & TRAVEL TALKS

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